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Identifying the types of Genuine 1st Issue 2 Grosze Stamps

Is the serif missing on the lower left 2?                                                1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

 Yes - It’s a type 5 stamp.

  No - continue                                    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8




A secondary test is to look at the first R in "Miasto Przedbórz" on the left side of the stamp. On type 5 stamps, the back leg has a a nick or a part "torn out." I have not seen these on forgeries.



Other differences, useful if a cancel obscures the two above:


Look at the Eagle’s eye. Notice the sloping line which goes from the top of the beak towards the eye. In most types, the line passes over or through the top of eye, and the eye is mostly indicated by a bulge below the line. However, does the eye on this stamp extend above the sloping line, or is there a spot and upward line above the sloping line?

 

 Yes (left image) - It’s a type 2 stamp.

 No (right image) - continue  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


Is there a dot at the lower left of the G in the lower Grosze?

 Yes - It’s a type 3 stamp.
 Note: sometimes the dot is extremely faint, and visible only under 30X magnification or with a high-resolution scan.   Conversly, I have one stamp in which the dot is joined to the G with a thin line.

 No - continue                          1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8






Look at the curved line inside the upper part of the wing on the right side of the stamp. Is there a dot near the inside of it?

 Yes - It’s a type 8 stamp.

 No - continue                          1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

 



Look at the right inner and outer frame lines. Do they merge together at the top?

 Yes - It’s a type 7 stamp.
Also see dot between A & S of Miasto

 No - continue                                                       1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


Is the frame line around the lower left “2” broken at the top left?

 Yes - It’s a type 6 stamp.

 No - continue                                                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8




In the top left “2" box, is the left shading line broken in 2 or 3 places near the top?


 Yes - It’s a type 4 stamp.

 No - continue                                   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


In the top right “2" box, is the second-from left line of shading broken once near the top? (Note: this box has a lot of other broken shading lines, but this is the only line which identifies a type 1.)


 Yes - It’s a type 1 stamp.

 No - Oops. You just ruled out all the genuine types of the 2 gr. eagle stamp.               1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Better try again.



A secondary test is to look at the first R in "Miasto Przedbórz" on the left side of the stamp. On type 1 stamps, the back leg has a distorted foot with a bulge. I have not seen these on forgeries.






Other descriptions:

Over the years, writers have concentrated on various “subjective” differences between genuine and forged stamps: They have different “swirls” in the background dots; different patterns of the U’s on the wings as well as on the body; different-shaped lettering of Przedborz (especially the right-side P and B) and of Grosze (especially the bottom one); different-shaped perfs and upper-left 2's, etc. My friend Gary Mattern says the 1917's are very different.

All this is a matter of the trained eye. You can poke around, and discover the differences that work for you, or use computer software to overlay different aspects of the stamps. I gave up on most of these techniques, because I wanted to avoid subjective judgments and reliance on comparisons with genuine stamps that you might not have.

One example is an alternative classification of genuine stamps based solely on differences in the upper-left corner of the 2 gr. Eagle stamp. This may be idiosyncratic to my collection, i.e., it may not work on yours. If so, I’d like to know where it fails. Try it.

Remember to verify that the stamp is genuine before trying to figure out what type of genuine stamp it as!
There is also a page of other distinguishing marks for various 2 gr. stamps.

Back to Eagle stamp main page.


© 2007-13 Sam Ginsburg

Last modified 24 Feb. 2013